Latest Comments

In response to: In the Woods, Tana French

Nancy

I loved this book-could hardly put it down, but I was still left feeling frustrated by not knowing what happened in the wood. Real life doesn’t tie up nicely but this is fiction!

25/06/08 @ 02:21

In response to: Let the Right One In, John Ajvide Lindqvist

Comment from: Carlos Eduardo  
Carlos Eduardo

Unfortunately, i saw the movie without reading the book.
None the less, i found the movie very, very good and the place was beautiful. It looks very good in the screen.
Now, i feel like visiting Blackberg…in the winter!

02/05/08 @ 19:46

In response to: Let the Right One In, John Ajvide Lindqvist

Comment from: John  
John

I moved to Blackeberg a few months back, then heard about the vampires, then found the book. Just finished it yesterday, while away on holiday in Spain. Walking around Blackeberg on my return tonight was weird. Most of the place is the same (I looked in the the gym hall, and walked past the school and under the bridge, just half an hour ago).
This is a breathtaking book (I read it in Swedish, although the English translation is supposed to be very good). It is horrible, repulsive, uplifting captivating. And as the reviewer writes, very graphic. If you have a sensitive disposition, hope the “easy-to-read” version comes out in English soon.
There is a movie, in Swedish, coming out in April. DO NOT watch the trailer until you have read the book.
Good review by Karen.
Johnno

05/02/08 @ 11:29

In response to: In the Woods, Tana French

Comment from: KC
KC

That’s a great comment sherryh - thanks for making it. There’s been a lot of books under the bridge since then so the charm that you mention, I’m struggling to place sorry.

29/10/07 @ 16:53

In response to: In the Woods, Tana French

sherryh

Yes, it wandered at times, but into places I was intrigued to go..
.and yes it did take longer to read than my usual novels, but I was glad
I didn’t want it to end…

BTW : What was the charm with the stick-man and antlers mentioned at the book’s end?

29/10/07 @ 11:17

In response to: Broken Skin, Stuart MacBride

Comment from: luke  
luke

i haven’t been reading this kind of books for a long time, infact i started reading the sherlock homes books when i was in highschool and i’ve only just left, but i must say that the MacBride books have been two of the best books ive read all year and i seriously recommend reading them to anyone.

03/10/07 @ 05:44

In response to: Amongst the Dead, Robert Gott

Peter

Thanks! This might fit in with my recent posts about crime fiction and Shakespeare.
===================
Detectives Beyond Borders
“Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home”
http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

18/09/07 @ 08:46

In response to: Adding Comments on http://www.austcrimefiction.org

Comment from: KC
KC

Of course none of this applies anymore because we’ve changed the package over to another environment completely.

Anyone can now add comments to any of the pages on the main site. Of course - we moderate those comments before publishing them.

10/09/07 @ 20:55

In response to: 2007 Ned Kelly Awards

Maxine

Well done to Adrian Hyland – I loved Diamond Dove.

03/09/07 @ 08:22

In response to: Oh the shame...........

Comment from: Evan  
Evan

I want to be where the strippers go.

Me too!

(sorry, couldn’t resist.)

20/08/07 @ 16:30

In response to: Main Site is down for a little while

Comment from: KC
KC

Sorry for the slight inconvenience - the DNS / domain name thingie has been kicked back into activity again and the main site (http://www.austcrimefiction.org) is back.

10/08/07 @ 11:43

In response to: In the Woods, Tana French

Comment from: KC
KC

Sandi - that’s a great comment - about it taking longer to read but not a bad longer. There are some books that you just savour aren’t there - sometimes I like that slow right down and enjoy the experience feeling.

02/08/07 @ 08:24

In response to: In the Woods, Tana French

Comment from: Sandi Lewis  
Sandi Lewis

I loved this book, but like you, I felt it kind of wandered a bit in places. I did figure out “who did it” about halfway through but it didn’t diminish the book. This took me a little longer to read than usual but it was not a bad longer. No, I wanted it to last and I thought about the story a lot even when I wasn’t reading. I’ll be looking for her next book, hoping it will be as good as this one.

02/08/07 @ 00:57

In response to: In the Woods, Tana French

Heatseekers

I’d see this as a likely Richard and Judy pick. Fantastic book!

31/07/07 @ 17:54

In response to: Wash This Blood Clean from my Hand, Fred Vargas

Peter

That makes me all the more eager to see what Montreal readers have to say. I am familiar with the old rivalry between Montreal and Toronto. I don’t know what you’d compare it to. Maybe London and Paris – if both were in the same country, each constantly anxious to be thought of as the preeminent city.

Maybe I’ll do some blog searches for Montreal readers’ reaction to Vargas.
===================
Detectives Beyond Borders
“Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home”
http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

28/07/07 @ 14:34

In response to: Wash This Blood Clean from my Hand, Fred Vargas

Comment from: KC
KC

LOL - I was wondering exactly what would be triggering the reaction but I never thought of English speaking Toronto - thanks for the giggle this morning ;)

28/07/07 @ 10:24

In response to: Wash This Blood Clean from my Hand, Fred Vargas

Peter

Josette can’t remember that Adamsberg is no longer a commisaire; I can’t remember from one post to the next that I had already told you I was from Montreal!

I can imagine that some sensitive French Quebecois readers might feel insulted that, for example, the most threatening, dangerous character in the novel, aside from Fulgence, is Laliberte, the RCMP leader in Hull. Perhaps they will be even less happy that the good Quebec cop who helps Adamsberg is rewarded with a transfer to English-speaking Toronto!

===================

Detectives Beyond Borders
“Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home”
http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

27/07/07 @ 14:49

In response to: Wash This Blood Clean from my Hand, Fred Vargas

Comment from: KC
KC

I’ll see if I can prompt some of them to contribute directly on your blog Peter.

27/07/07 @ 11:29

In response to: Wash This Blood Clean from my Hand, Fred Vargas

Peter

I’d love to see those comments from Montreal readers. I am from Montreal, so Vargas’ take on the misunderstandings between the Quebecois and the French were of special interest to me. I’ve been looking for an excuse to make a post about it.
===================

Detectives Beyond Borders
“Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home”
http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

27/07/07 @ 11:22

In response to: Wash This Blood Clean from my Hand, Fred Vargas

Comment from: KC
KC

I saw your comments on your blog about the book as well Peter - I really enjoyed the whole book but I understand from somebody on another list that she might have annoyed a few Montreal readers :)

27/07/07 @ 09:17

In response to: Wash This Blood Clean from my Hand, Fred Vargas

Peter

And then there is the comedy of the misunderstandings between the French and the Quebecois police. I especially appreciate this, since I am from Montreal.
==============
Detectives Beyond Borders
“Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home”
http://www.detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

27/07/07 @ 04:07

In response to: In the Woods, Tana French

Comment from: David
David

Lots of people are discovering Tana French’s “In the Woods.” Rights have been sold for editions in 19 languages. Reviews have been outstanding. In the New York Times Book Review, Marilyn Stasio wrote about the “lyrical ferocity” of French’s writing. The Washington Post said the book is “ambitious and extraordinary,” “daring,” “meticulously imagined,” and concludes, “rank it high.” The London Times described this as a “terrific debut” in which “French’s psychological insights combine grippingly with the clammy atmosphere that surrounds the lethal woods.” BBC Radio called the book “stunning” and said “the literary world is abuzz with praise for a new talent.” Can’t go wrong with this one!

22/07/07 @ 01:02

In response to: Broken Skin, Stuart MacBride

Comment from: KC
KC

I’m not much of a McBain reader so I can’t comment on the way he does it, but the MacBride method does have a slight feel of the Reginald Hill’s about it, the way he will sometimes shift the emphasis between Dalziel’s colleagues. Of course, MacBride has a central character who’s more at Peter Pascoe’s level so it’s not exactly the same and works really well. But if you’ve not read MacBride I’d highly recommend that you give him a go - the books have been one of the great discoveries of my reading time in the last year or so.

21/07/07 @ 14:25

In response to: Broken Skin, Stuart MacBride

Peter

I just glanced at your MacBride reviews here. Among other things, I was interested to see he shifts focus from book to book, moving from one officer to another. Sounds as if he might be building up an Ed McBain-like body of work, though McBain would do his focus-shifting within rather than between books.

==================
Detectives Beyond Borders
“Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home”
http://www.detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

21/07/07 @ 04:16

In response to: Why I Liked: The Coroner's Lunch, Colin Cotterill

Peter

I’m not sure I like supernatural element any more than you do, but they’re not bothering me so far in Coroner’s Lunch. Siri’s dreams are easily, um, rationalized, for instance (Subconscious insights bubbling up). As for how some of the more intense such elements will play out, I still have reading to do.

One of the scenes resembles a scene I saw of a cadomble ceremony in a Brazilian movie, probably one of the versions of Orfeu/Black Orpheus. In any case, the earlier dream scenes in Coroner’s Lunch probably prepare me (and Siri) for some of what came later.
==============
Detectives Beyond Borders
“Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home”
http://www.detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

19/07/07 @ 16:18

In response to: LibraryThing

Comment from: Evan  
Evan

Doh, it’s “Coben", not “Coban".

Tell No One is actually being made into a French movie. The trailer for it looks good.

http://www.revolvergroup.com/tellnoone/trailer/mov/trailer_large.mov

RE: Neil Gaiman, I’ll give Neverwhere a go.

18/07/07 @ 16:41

In response to: LibraryThing

Comment from: aj
aj

Neil Gaiman has written some good stuff and I don’t think American Gods is amongst that. Try his Neverwhere, which I thought was a much better read.

18/07/07 @ 14:02

In response to: LibraryThing

Comment from: KC
KC

Oy - there’s Tell No One - I did say I’d read one of his books - I just didn’t like it :)

18/07/07 @ 12:38

In response to: LibraryThing

Comment from: Evan  
Evan

What? No Harlan Coban? :-)

Hey Adam (if you’re reading), what do you think of Neil Gaiman? I tried reading American Gods and tossed it about a third of the way in - found it just tedious. (Mind you, I’m not a fantasy fan so this was probably one of the worst books of his for me to try first.)

Sometimes you find an author (or an actor for those of you who watch movies*) that you want to like, but you just can’t quite manage it…

(* They even have ones with sound now! They’re called “talkies".)

17/07/07 @ 23:07

In response to: The Broken Shore

Peter

I was chuffed when The Broken Shore won. I did not read the novel as early on as you did, but I am pleased to have read it before most North American crime-fiction fans.

By the way, I just read something interesting about the pronunciation of jack irish’s family name!
==============
Detectives Beyond Borders
“Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home”
http://www.detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

07/07/07 @ 16:15

In response to: The Lying Tongue, Andrew Wilson

Comment from: KC
KC

Evan - it was due for release on 2nd July 2007 so it’s around - your friendly local librarian should be able to order it in - and I do think you may have “connections” in that department :)

04/07/07 @ 17:52

In response to: The Lying Tongue, Andrew Wilson

Comment from: Evan  
Evan

Sounds like book had a very apt title.

Hmmm, not available in the local library yet. :-(

04/07/07 @ 17:40

In response to: Melbourne Writers Festival - Opening Dinner

Comment from: KC
KC

Rosemary - thank you very much for the update - it’s an exciting lineup - and personally I’m really looking forward to John Ajvide Lindqvist - I just loved Let the Right One In.

We’ll be at MWF again this year in force, with members of the same online reading groups coming to join us, from Tasmania, New South Wales and South Australia to have some fun. This will be our 4th year of attending in a group and it’s a highlight event for all of us.

28/06/07 @ 15:55

In response to: Melbourne Writers Festival - Opening Dinner

Rosemary Cameron

Hello
just wanted to give you an idea of some of the crime/thriller writers coming to The Age Melbourne Writers’ Festival this year.

There are some biggies like Jeffery Deaver, Karin Slaughter, Gabrielle Lord, Shane Maloney, Quintin Jardine, Michael Robotham and David Hewson. And for those who like their crime gentle, Alexander McCall Smith. Some newcomers like Leah Giarratano, Andrew Hutchinson and Geoffrey Cousins. Dorothy Porter returns to crime in verse. James Phelan has another thriller, Patriot Act. Adrian Hyland takes his crime to the red centre and Liz Porter talks true crime.

Juli Zeh from Leipzig writes crime stories from that lawless land that opens up when countries disappear and new ones are formed - perfect for organised crime to move in, drug and people smuggling.

John Ajvide Lindqvist is a stand-out Swedish writer whose new novel fally somewhere between crime, horror and romance. A vampire love-story.

Don’t forget the Ned Kelly Awards on Wednesday 29 August in the evening - ree-of-charge to attend and always fantastic entertainment.

Keep an eye on our website - www.mwf.com.au

28/06/07 @ 15:27

In response to: Murder is Never Pretty... Even When the Corpse is a Blonde, Joe Blake

Joe Blake

Hey, great review for my book. Glad you enjoyed it and had fun reading it! My next crime fighting memoir, Warning Shots Last will be released shortly. This time I was pretty lucky to get out of a tight situation nearly unscathed. I mean, heck, when you have a early morning visit from a babe knows as Madame Lachet anything can happen. Phew, and as for the bad guy … I got the mongrel who murdered the girl and managed to save a special babe who was next in line. My fans have been asking me what else I have in the pipeline? I’ve actually been to Kalbarri surfing as part of my recovery but you don’t get much of a break when you are a premier crime fighter. It appears the the DPP’s daughter has been kidnapped by local bikies as a payback for the imprisonment of one of their poledancers who was stitched up by the local narcs. Its a mess. Now they want me to go undercover and see if I can rescue her before things get a bit rough. Its a tough job but someone has to do it. So you can read all about it in The Bikie’s Cage which is due for release in 2008. Keep an eye on my web page. If you would like a pdf sample chapter of Warning Shots Last send me an email at joeblake@joeblakecom.au or email my publisher Bob Sheppard at bobsheppard@warrigalpress.com.au

From Warning Shots Last .. ” You can shoot a man hard or you can shoot a man soft. Hard would have been in the guts or the nuts or the knees. Considering what he had done I shot him soft, too soft for the rabid mongrel dog he was. I shot him right between the eyes.”

Cheers from Australia’s leading crime fighter … Joe Blake !

19/06/07 @ 00:16

In response to: The Seducer, Jan Kjærstad

Comment from: Evan  
Evan

Yes well… first thing I did when we moved in our new place was cut a hole in the wall and install a bookshelf next to the loo for Michelle. :-)

09/06/07 @ 16:32

In response to: The Seducer, Jan Kjærstad

Comment from: KC
KC

Major priority in every house we’ve ever lived in is the bookshelf in the loo - it’s a must (as is a carefully crafted loo schedule if somebody’s reading a good book :) )

09/06/07 @ 10:55

In response to: The Seducer, Jan Kjærstad

Comment from: Evan  
Evan

Ah, well I’m not a habitual loo reader, and I take the book I’m currently reading (which is Peepshow at the moment) with me if I’m reading away from home. Looks like it’s serial monogamy for me.

09/06/07 @ 09:25

In response to: The Seducer, Jan Kjærstad

Comment from: aj
aj

I quite often read multiple books at once. One in the loo, one for bedtime, and one for the pub - or other public place. Never really been a problem. When at school I would quite often read 4, 5 or even 6 books at once.

I guess it is just what you are used to. Subject matter can be a problem, although it has to be pretty similar for me to get confused. I did have a problem recently reading two books, both historical fantasy covering similar historical periods.

08/06/07 @ 22:11

In response to: The Seducer, Jan Kjærstad

Comment from: KC
KC

As long as the subject matter is different doesn’t worry me (I’m actually reading 3 at once - the other’s an Autobiography though so it’s completely different).

The only thing I’ve had to do as the years advance is watch that subject matter problem - tried to read two serial killer books simultaneously a while ago and ended up so confused I had to go back and re-read one of them from scratch :)

08/06/07 @ 21:57

In response to: The Seducer, Jan Kjærstad

Comment from: Evan  
Evan

How do you read more than one (fiction) book at a time?

I’ll stop one to read another that I’ve just got and been hanging out for, and then go back - but reading two concurrently?

08/06/07 @ 21:47

In response to: Plaster Sinners, Colin Watson

Peter

I’ve just posted a comment about Lonelyheart 4122 at http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/2007/05/colin-watson.html. Many thanks for playing a role in introducing me to Colin Watson.
===================
Detectives Beyond Borders
“Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home”
http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

30/05/07 @ 10:13

In response to: Plaster Sinners, Colin Watson

Peter

By coincidence, I bought Plaster Sinners today in my local secondhand bookshop (along with Lonelyeheart 4222).

I had made a post on my blog about humorous crime novels (http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/2007/05/laughs-and-death-or-what-are-funniest.html, if you’d care to take a look), and someone suggested in a reply that I give Watson a try. I like the openings of both books.
===================
Detectives Beyond Borders
“Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home”
http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

28/05/07 @ 09:09

In response to: Murder by Wash of Light, Geoff De Fraga

Comment from: KC
KC

Untravelled critic hmmm - well unsurprisingly seeing as it’s my blog it was me.

Glamorous (that’s the correct spelling as far as I know) is defined in my dictionary as:

“Having an air of allure, romance and excitement”

Having been to Canberra many many many many many many many times I’ve never noticed anything vaguely romantic or particularly exciting so I guess I don’t find it all that terribly alluring.

01/05/07 @ 17:18

In response to: Murder by Wash of Light, Geoff De Fraga

margaret

Of course Canberra is glamourous! Who was the un-travelled critic who wrote the few sentences above?
And do tell me - how does one city rate as more or less ‘glamourous ‘ than another?

01/05/07 @ 17:11

In response to: Launch of Sucked In by Shane Maloney

Peter

I’d love to get to that even though it’s thousands of miles and a whole lot of time zones away.
==============================
Detectives Beyond Borders
“Because Murder is More Fun Away From Home”
www.detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com

28/04/07 @ 15:37

In response to: The Assassins Gallery, David L Robbins

David L. Robbins

Karen,

Excellent website. I just bumped into it. Thanks for the great review of The Assassins Gallery. Cheers.

David L. Robbins

26/04/07 @ 14:45

In response to: The Man on the Balcony, Maj Sjowall & Per Wahloo

Comment from: KC
KC

I just finished The Laughing Policeman - which is the next in the series and that’s forwwarded by Sean & Nicci French.

Roseanna - the first in the series is introduced, most appropriately, by Henning Mankell.

The Man Who Went up in Smoke - I’m not sure - I’ve got a copy winging it’s way here from the UK :)

22/04/07 @ 13:26

In response to: The Man on the Balcony, Maj Sjowall & Per Wahloo

Peter

Who are some the other authors who wrote introductions to the new editions?

===================
Detectives Beyond Borders
“Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home”
http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

22/04/07 @ 13:14

In response to: 2007 Gumshoe Award Nominations are out

Peter

I’ve just finished He Who Fears the Wolf, and my initial impression holds. The more I read, the more this book impressed me. I posted a comment yesterday at http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/2007/04/he-who-fears-wolf-by-karin-fossum.html, and I’ll post another.

Some of your comments about Don’t Look Back would hold true for He Who Fears the Wolf as well, especially the possible ambiguous ending and the compassionate portrayal in this case of several intellectually disabled outsiders. I’ll definitely look for more of Karin Fossum’s work.
======================

Detectives Beyond Borders
“Because Murder Is More Fun Away From Home”
http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/

18/04/07 @ 13:36